Great mistakes in politics (No29) Nixon selects Spiro Agnew as his running mate

All in all I’ve always thought that Spiro Agnew got off rather lightly. In normal circumstances the Vice-President of the United States having to resign from office due to fraud and tax evasion would be the scandal of the decade. However because the Nixon Whitehouse was currently engulfed in the firestorm that was Watergate, and Nixon was soon to resign himself, Agnew somehow slipped through the cracks.

To say that Agnew has a low historical reputation is putting it mildly. Nixon was a crook and a liar but even his enemies had to admit that he was an incredibly smart guy, Agnew, to put it mildly, wasn’t. He’d only been selected as Vice-President in the first place as part of Nixon’s ‘Southern strategy’. At the time the accepted political wisdom was that Presidents needed to balance the ticket by choosing a VP candidate sufficiently unlike themselves in order to appeal to a different set of voters. Nixon obviously felt that he had northern Republicans in the bag but was weaker amongst southern Republicans/Dixicrats.

The South was currently going through a period of political realignment. Traditionally it had always been Democratic since the 1860s, however since Kennedy and LBJ’s civil rights programme it had slowly been shifting away from the Democratic Party towards the Republicans (briefly stopping over first with Wallace’s Independents). Agnew was from Maryland so Nixon thought he could use him to appeal to disaffected Democratic voters and southern Republicans, or as Hunter S Thompson said less kindly, but possibly more accurately, he was ‘a sop to the yahoo/racist vote’.

It’s fair to say that no one took Agnew particularly seriously as a figure of political leadership. The Democrats ran TV adverts openly laughing at him and questioning who he was while even Nixon commented, ‘No one’s going to assassinate me as they’d end up with Agnew as President’. If that sounds like a frosty response then it got worse as their first term went on with Nixon openly plotting to get rid of his Vice-President and attacking him at every opportunity.

Agnew rose incredibly quickly through the political world to the Vice-Presidency and as a result they hadn’t checked his background as accurately as they probably should have. As it later turned out there were a few skeletons in his closet relating to his time in Maryland politics and he was investigated for tax evasion and a host of other charges. In the end Agnew accepted a plea bargain and agreed to resign the Vice-Presidency in order to keep himself out of jail. His crimes caught up with him though, and a decade later he had to pay a quarter of a million dollars back to the state of Maryland.

In his defence Agnew  was a popular Vice-President with the Republican grassroots and I suppose performed a useful service in terms of deflecting attention away from Nixon and his misdeeds. However in retrospect I think that even he’d admit that Agnew was one of his greatest political mistakes as after the Presidency he never spoke to him again as long as he lived.

Here is the Democrats rather cruel anti-Agnew advert from 1968 (it probably backfired on them and made people feel sorry for Agnew):

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=910ZG2qI3z0

For a full list of great mistakes in politics please click here

About these ads

About matthewashton

I'm a Politics Lecturer at Nottingham Trent University. I specialise in the fields of American, British and media politics.
This entry was posted in American politics, Great mistakes in politics and tagged , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

7 Responses to Great mistakes in politics (No29) Nixon selects Spiro Agnew as his running mate

  1. I always thought Agnew was picked for Veep because as governor he’d been quite progressive on race issues, like housing and desegregation. If memory serves, I think he was even elected by running to the left of a racist Democrat (could be wrong).

    • He was early on. He was even a big Rockefeller supporter at one point, but it changed around the time he called out most of the moderate black leaders in Baltimore for being “responsible” for the riots after Dr. King’s assassination. Agnew went over the bend after that and the sensible moderate Republican he once was was replaced with an angry lunatic who liked to yell at college kids that they should “go get a job”.

    • Agnew was reasonably centralist up until the late 1960s but if you look at his speeches during the 68 election he certainly seems to be trying to appeal the southen vote by playing that card. I think Agnew was selected because he could bring the southern vote and Nixon’s new ‘silent majority’ without actually representing the ‘old deep south’.

      Nixon and race is a very interesting issue in itself. If you listen to his taped office conversations he made a host of amazingly racist comments yet several African-American entertainers like James Brown and Sammy Davis Jr supported him.

  2. I have to disagree with you on this one. The nomination of Spiro Agnew is Richard Nixon’s finest work of comic genius. Anyone who could say “nattering nabobs of negativism” and “hysterical hopeless hypochondriacs of history” has to be viewed as a great addition to the storied canon of American Theatre of the Absurd. Spiro T. Agnew is more than a man….he’s a way of life.

  3. Pingback: Great mistakes in politics (No31) John McCain choses Sarah Palin as his running mate | Dr Matthew Ashton's Politics Blog

  4. Pingback: Great mistakes in politics (No32) John McCain choses Sarah Palin as his running mate | Dr Matthew Ashton's Politics Blog

  5. Pingback: Great mistakes in politics (No32) John McCain chooses Sarah Palin as his running mate | Dr Matthew Ashton's Politics Blog

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s